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This is my blog and I just post things that catch my eye. If you need me to tag anything, just let me know!

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

thepoliticalfreakshow:

BREAKING: Here’s The Map Of What Marriage Equality Looks Like In The US Today (UPDATED 10/21/14)

Same-sex couples can marry in a majority of states in the country — something that was not true until October 2014. Since the Supreme Court decided not to hear appeals of challenges to five states’ marriage bans on Oct. 6, the ground has been shifting quickly.
As the process continues to play out, BuzzFeed News will be updating this map and the descriptions below to keep tabs on what’s happening at any given moment in the many challenges to bans playing out across the country.


States With Full Marriage Equality:
In the less than 10-and-a-half years since same-sex couples began marrying in Massachusetts, 24 other states and Washington, D.C., have joined the ranks of states where same-sex couples can marry.
In 13 jurisdictions, lawmakers voted for marriage equality — although voters initially reversed that action in Maine and the legislation was vetoed in California. The other 11 jurisdictions: Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Washington, D.C.
Voters in three states approved marriage equality at the polls: Maine in an initiative the reversed voters’ earlier decision, as well as Maryland and Washington, where efforts to reverse marriage equality through a referendum were rebuffed.
State courts, considering state law, found a right to marriage equality in Hawaii, Massachusetts, California, Connecticut, Iowa, New Jersey, and New Mexico — although constitutional amendments later reversed those decisions in Hawaii and California.
Finally, beginning with Utah, the final frontier of marriage equality — federal courts considering federal rights — led to marriage equality after courts found bans on same-sex couples’ marriages to be unconstitutional in 10 states: Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.


States With Marriage Equality, But With Related Appeal Still Pending:
In this quickly changing environment, there are a growing number of states where same-sex couples are able to marry — but a related appeal, from some person or organization, is ongoing.
In Oregon, the National Organization for Marriage attempted to intervene in the case and was denied. They appealed that denial, were rejected, and have asked the full appeals court to rehear their appeal. In light of the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision that outside groups have no standing to appeal a marriage decision when state or local officials no longer are appealing the issue, NOM is unlikely to succeed in this appeal.
In Nevada, the Coalition for the Protection of Marriage has asked the full appeals court to rehear last week’s decision striking down Nevada’s ban on same-sex couples’ marriages. For the same reason as with the Prop 8 case, the coalition here is unlikely to succeed in this appeal request.
In North Carolina, state lawmakers have attempted to intervene in marriage litigation and could attempt to appeal decisions ending the state’s marriage ban.
In Alaska and Idaho, officials have said they will be appealing the district court and appeals court decisions, respectively, further.


States With A Marriage Decision On Hold Pending Appeal:
Several decisions in favor of marriage equality or requiring recognition of same-sex couples’ marriages granted elsewhere are on hold, or stayed, while appeals are ongoing.
These include federal appeals in the 5th Circuit, 6th Circuit, and 11th Circuit courts of appeals, as well as some state courts.
In the 5th Circuit, appeals are pending from Texas, where the state’s ban was ruled to be unconstitutional, and Louisiana, where it was upheld.
In the 6th Circuit, arguments were held in early August regarding all four states’ bans. A decision is eagerly awaited, and it will address the marriage ban in Kentucky and Michigan and marriage recognition in Ohio and Tennessee. In all four states, the state lost at the trial court.
In the 11th Circuit, an appeal is pending from Florida, where the state’s ban was struck down in the trial court.
State court appeals are pending in three states, where trial courts struck down the bans in Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana.


States With Marriage Recognition, But Not Full Marriage Equality:
After a Missouri state court ordered that out-of-state marriages of same-sex couples must be recognized in the state, Missouri’s attorney general announced the state would not be appealing the decision.


States Where Marriage Equality Is Expected To Follow In Short Order:
Because four federal appeals courts have decided that state bans on same-sex couples’ marriages are unconstitutional, that is the precedent in — or law of — those circuits. It is expected, therefore, that other states in those circuits with marriage bans will have those bans struck down in short order.
In the 4th Circuit, South Carolina officials continue to defend the ban and a federal case challenging the ban is pending.
In the 9th Circuit, Montana still bans same-sex couples from marrying and a federal case is pending.
In the 10th Circuit, Kansas officials continue to defend the ban. State court proceedings challenging the ban are pending the state, as is a federal challenge.


States Still Awaiting Action On Marriage Equality:
There are only six states without marriage equality or marriage recognition where marriage equality is not anticipated in short order due to circuit precedent and where no marriage decisions are on hold pending appeal.
They are Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.
There are pending marriage, marriage recognition, or divorce cases pending in some of these states, but there have been no decisions in favor of same-sex couples there thus far.

Source: Chris Geidner for Buzzfeed News

thepoliticalfreakshow:

BREAKING: Here’s The Map Of What Marriage Equality Looks Like In The US Today (UPDATED 10/21/14)

Same-sex couples can marry in a majority of states in the country — something that was not true until October 2014. Since the Supreme Court decided not to hear appeals of challenges to five states’ marriage bans on Oct. 6, the ground has been shifting quickly.

As the process continues to play out, BuzzFeed News will be updating this map and the descriptions below to keep tabs on what’s happening at any given moment in the many challenges to bans playing out across the country.

States With Full Marriage Equality:


In the less than 10-and-a-half years since same-sex couples began marrying in Massachusetts, 24 other states and Washington, D.C., have joined the ranks of states where same-sex couples can marry.

In 13 jurisdictions, lawmakers voted for marriage equality — although voters initially reversed that action in Maine and the legislation was vetoed in California. The other 11 jurisdictions: Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, and Washington, D.C.

Voters in three states approved marriage equality at the polls: Maine in an initiative the reversed voters’ earlier decision, as well as Maryland and Washington, where efforts to reverse marriage equality through a referendum were rebuffed.

State courts, considering state law, found a right to marriage equality in Hawaii, Massachusetts, California, Connecticut, Iowa, New Jersey, and New Mexico — although constitutional amendments later reversed those decisions in Hawaii and California.

Finally, beginning with Utah, the final frontier of marriage equality — federal courts considering federal rights — led to marriage equality after courts found bans on same-sex couples’ marriages to be unconstitutional in 10 states: Arizona, Colorado, Indiana, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

States With Marriage Equality, But With Related Appeal Still Pending:


In this quickly changing environment, there are a growing number of states where same-sex couples are able to marry — but a related appeal, from some person or organization, is ongoing.

In Oregon, the National Organization for Marriage attempted to intervene in the case and was denied. They appealed that denial, were rejected, and have asked the full appeals court to rehear their appeal. In light of the Supreme Court’s 2013 decision that outside groups have no standing to appeal a marriage decision when state or local officials no longer are appealing the issue, NOM is unlikely to succeed in this appeal.

In Nevada, the Coalition for the Protection of Marriage has asked the full appeals court to rehear last week’s decision striking down Nevada’s ban on same-sex couples’ marriages. For the same reason as with the Prop 8 case, the coalition here is unlikely to succeed in this appeal request.

In North Carolina, state lawmakers have attempted to intervene in marriage litigation and could attempt to appeal decisions ending the state’s marriage ban.

In Alaska and Idaho, officials have said they will be appealing the district court and appeals court decisions, respectively, further.

States With A Marriage Decision On Hold Pending Appeal:


Several decisions in favor of marriage equality or requiring recognition of same-sex couples’ marriages granted elsewhere are on hold, or stayed, while appeals are ongoing.

These include federal appeals in the 5th Circuit, 6th Circuit, and 11th Circuit courts of appeals, as well as some state courts.

In the 5th Circuit, appeals are pending from Texas, where the state’s ban was ruled to be unconstitutional, and Louisiana, where it was upheld.

In the 6th Circuit, arguments were held in early August regarding all four states’ bans. A decision is eagerly awaited, and it will address the marriage ban in Kentucky and Michigan and marriage recognition in Ohio and Tennessee. In all four states, the state lost at the trial court.

In the 11th Circuit, an appeal is pending from Florida, where the state’s ban was struck down in the trial court.

State court appeals are pending in three states, where trial courts struck down the bans in Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana.

States With Marriage Recognition, But Not Full Marriage Equality:


After a Missouri state court ordered that out-of-state marriages of same-sex couples must be recognized in the state, Missouri’s attorney general announced the state would not be appealing the decision.

States Where Marriage Equality Is Expected To Follow In Short Order:


Because four federal appeals courts have decided that state bans on same-sex couples’ marriages are unconstitutional, that is the precedent in — or law of — those circuits. It is expected, therefore, that other states in those circuits with marriage bans will have those bans struck down in short order.

In the 4th Circuit, South Carolina officials continue to defend the ban and a federal case challenging the ban is pending.

In the 9th Circuit, Montana still bans same-sex couples from marrying and a federal case is pending.

In the 10th Circuit, Kansas officials continue to defend the ban. State court proceedings challenging the ban are pending the state, as is a federal challenge.

States Still Awaiting Action On Marriage Equality:


There are only six states without marriage equality or marriage recognition where marriage equality is not anticipated in short order due to circuit precedent and where no marriage decisions are on hold pending appeal.

They are Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota.

There are pending marriage, marriage recognition, or divorce cases pending in some of these states, but there have been no decisions in favor of same-sex couples there thus far.

Source: Chris Geidner for Buzzfeed News

pumpkinkraken:

which person of ur otp furiously does push-ups while the other sits on their back and reads a magazine

I think it’s very important members of the YouTube community {mainly viewers} watch this video, regardless of whether or not they are a fan of Jack + Finn Harries {JacksGap}. 

The video is a poem which Jack wrote in regards to the recent events within the YouTube community regarding Sam and Jason {and also Alex Day}. Personally, as someone who is both rather good friends with people in the community and is still somewhat of an active viewer, I do have a lot of questions and one which appears to keep on cropping up is this; where do we go from here?

Of course, Jack cannot give us a definitive answer, nobody can. I like to think of this video as some sort of peace of mind for us. YouTube was based off of the foundation of a viewer-creator relationship. This platform only works if the people viewing the content continue to do so; if you cut out the consumer there is nothing there for the creator, and then the whole operation ceases to exist. Here, in this video, Jack gives us an idea. He reassures us that not everybody is like them, that not all of our favourite creators are such monsters. 

"There are some individuals who simply don’t belong here,
You see for some a level of influence seem to lead to an inexcusable ignorance,
You see there are certain characters who have recently made the news, those who use their power to abuse.
But believe me when I say, their names will soon fade away.”
I feel like this one section {1:27-1:45} is something many have been desperate to hear. These people will not be around forever, in a few years time you will not remember Alex Day’s face and Jason’s name will be forgotten; they will simply become nightmares of old times passed and nothing more than bad memories from what some humans are capable of. 

This is inexcusable, and while we will forget them {at least their YouTube career}, their crimes will not be and neither will their victims. 

TL;DR: My hat goes off to Jack Harries, a young man who answered a lot of questions for a community that is still somewhat confused and incredibly lost, and did so in such a manner that was both beautiful and poetic. 

hawaii-n-jones:

The fact that both of these reactions came from males

xlikegold:

bootsnblossoms:

femininefreak:

Gloria Steinem and Dorothy Pitman-Hughes, 1972 and 2014

Both by Dan Bagan

Wanna see my cry like a baby? Ask me who these women were.

Hughes’ father was beaten nearly to death by the KKK when she was a kid, and what does she do? Become an activist to try and stop that from happening to other people. She raised money to bail civil rights protesters out of jail. She helped women get out of abusive situations by providing shelter for them until they got on their feet. She founded an agency that helped women get to work without having to leave their children alone, because childcare in the 1970s? Not really a thing. In fact, a famous feminist line in the 70s was “every housewife is one man away from welfare.”

Then she teamed up with Steinman to found the Women’s Action Alliance, which created the first battered women’s shelters in history. They attacked women’s rights issues through boots on the ground activism, problem solving, and communication. They stomped over barriers of race and class to meet women where they were: mostly mothers who wanted better for themselves and their children.

These are women are who I always wanted to be.

Let’s not forget that these ladies are STILL out there grinding on the front lines for feminism.

bisexualdemondean:

I like my women how I like my men. 

.

.

That’s it.

That’s the joke. 

I am bisexual.

Step one: Imagine Alfred and Mattie at a park
Step two: Imagine them playing on the swing set
Step three: Imagine Alfred pushing Mattie so hard on the swings that he does a full 360 five times around the hanging bar

comeheregoaway:

imthejesusofsuburbia:

we finish each other’s s

pace: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.

queen-mzbigabootie:

haneefistheonlyone:

kwamejaw:

Im pretty sure I walk past a lot more cops than that

queen-mzbigabootie:

haneefistheonlyone:

kwamejaw:

Im pretty sure I walk past a lot more cops than that

image